Inconsistencies in the Golf Swing





  2015/06/01

Of course, every time a golfer goes out to play a North Myrtle Beach golf course, they want to play well. This, however, is not the case, as more often than not swing inconsistencies cause a mishit of the golf ball. There are many types of swing inconsistencies that can cause many different types of mishits. In fact, there is only one type of true consistent swing, one that gets the face of the club to square at impact with proper swing plane. Any other swing, one that doesn’t get the face of the club to square at impact or a swing with improper swing plane, will produce a type of mishit.

A common form of mishit is the slice. A slice occurs when a golfer hits the golf ball and it tails to the right in the air for a right-handed golfer. Slices are caused by an open clubface at impact, which puts “slice-spin” on the ball. This spin is what causes the shot to drift to the right. Depending on the swing plane, with an open clubface, a player’s slice can be a pull-slice, which starts on the left and is caused by an out-to-in swing path, a straight slice, caused by a smooth swing path and starts straight, and a push slice, which starts right and is caused by an in-to-out swing path. A slice is not to be confused with a fade, which also travels left-to-right in the air. A fade is a much gentler form of the slice and is often seen as a good shot.

Similar to the slice, a hook occurs when a golfer hits the ball and it tails left in the air for a right-hander. Hooks are caused by a closed clubface at impact, putting “hook-spin” on the ball. This hook spin is what causes the ball to curve severely to the left. A hook can also be a pull-hook, a straight-hook, and a push-hook. A pull-hook is caused by an out-to-in swing path with a closed clubface at impact. A straight hook is caused by simply a closed face at impact with a proper swing path. A push-hook is caused by a closed face combined with an in-to-out swing path. A hook is not to be confused with a draw, which is a much less severe form of hook, and is often seen as the preferred ball flight for any golf shot.

Although the previous two are the most common forms of swing inconsistencies, there are many other forms of mishits caused by inconsistencies in the swing. These include the shank, thin shot and thick shot. The shank can be caused by an overactive lower body, an out-to-in swing path, or poor wrist rotation at impact. The thin shot, also called a blade, is often caused by lifting one’s head up on the ball at impact. The thick shot, or chunk, can be caused by too low of a setup, poor positioning at setup, or improper motion of the body during the swing.

A knowledge of the causes of these mishits in instrumental on the way to curing the common ailments of the golf swing as you play Eagle Nest Golf Club or any other North Myrtle Beach golf course.