The Effects of Wind on Myrtle Beach Golf Courses





  2019/02/01

Oftentimes weather conditions affect the normal play of golf. Some weather conditions can affect many aspects of one's golf game, whether it be the position from which they play or the club they choose to hit a shot.

One of the most common, as well as the most unpredictable, weather conditions golfers are forced to deal with at En Golf Club and any Myrtle Beach golf course is wind. Wind can cause many changes in the way one plays a shot, as it is variable in both speed and direction.

A player hitting a shot in the opposite direction the wind is blowing is said to be hitting into the wind. Playing into the wind on a hole can cause the hole to play significantly longer than usual, depending on the wind speed. Because of this players playing into the wind often have to hit a longer club for the shot to travel the desired distance. Skilled players playing into the wind may also hit a lower shot, as the wind does not affect a lower shot as much as it does a higher shot.

A player hitting a shot in the direction the wind is blowing is said to be hitting with the wind. Hitting with the wind is also said to be hitting downwind or with the wind at your back. A player playing a shot with the wind can hit the shot much farther than usual. This distance is variable on the wind speed. Players playing with the wind often must take shorter clubs in order to compensate for the gained distance. Skilled players playing with the wind may decide to hit a higher shot, as the wind can cause the ball to carry farther if the ball is higher rather than lower.

The wind can also cause the ball to take an unexpected ball flight on a Myrtle Beach golf course. A rough sideways wind can wreak havoc on a ball’s flight. A crosswind traveling from the golfer’s right can cause the ball to take on a draw-like flight and in some severe cases a hook-like flight. The golfer can compensate for this by aiming his shot farther right.

On the other hand, a crosswind traveling from the golfer’s left can cause the ball to take on a fade-like flight and even a slice-like flight in some severe cases. In this scenario, the golfer can aim farther left to compensate for the extreme flight. In order to avoid some changes in ball flight many skilled golfers play lower shots to avoid contact with the wind. A rough crosswind can also knock the ball down, and may constitute the use of a longer club in order to get the shot to travel the desired distance.

The most extreme winds come into play when playing directly adjacent to a large body of water. For example, a Myrtle Beach golf course adjacent to the ocean may have extremely rough winds coming onto the course. The mastery of playing in the wind is necessary for those who play in these environments.